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ikoaṅkār satigur prasādi.
rāgu devgandhārī    mahalā 9.

yah manu naik na kahio karai.
sīkh sikhāi rahio apnī sī    durmati te na ṭarai.1. rahāu.
madi māiā kai bhaïo bāvaro    hari jasu nahi ucrai.
kari parpancu jagat kaü ḍahkai    apno udaru bharai.1.
suān pūch jiu hoi na sūdho    kahio na kān dharai.
kahu nānak  bhaju rām nām nit    jā te kāju sarai.2.1.   
-Guru Granth Sahib 536

ikoaṅkār satigur prasādi.

rāgu devgandhārī    mahalā 9.

yah manu naik na kahio karai.

sīkh sikhāi rahio apnī sī    durmati te na ṭarai.1. rahāu.

madi māiā kai bhaïo bāvaro    hari jasu nahi ucrai.

kari parpancu jagat kaü ḍahkai    apno udaru bharai.1.

suān pūch jiu hoi na sūdho    kahio na kān dharai.

kahu nānak  bhaju rām nām nit    jā te kāju sarai.2.1.   

-Guru Granth Sahib 536

The rag (musical mode) that this composition is set in is an ancient one. Guru Teghbahadar uses this ancient musical mode to discuss ancient behaviors and a sort of primordial struggle of the mind. Science tells us that human beings have existed for 300,000 years, while our older relatives, hominids, existed 4.4 million years ago. Overall of that time, overall of those lifetimes and generations of changing and evolving, this primordial struggle has been a constant: the mind does not do even a bit of what is said. The mind does not want to learn. The mind is stubborn. The mind does not do what it is told. The mind likes to think it has its own understanding that is better. It does not shy away from doing things that are not good for it. 

What happens when we are caught up in this phenomenon that none of us is immune from? The mind becomes intoxicated, and it goes into a madness in this intoxication. It does not have time to be aware of the fears it has. It suppresses things instead of confronting them. It causes us to act with greed and act without shame. We find our minds doing this from a young age — we do not want to do our chores, we do not want to clean up after ourselves, we do not want to do our schoolwork, and the more we are told that we ought to be doing something, the less we want to do it. When we are older, the mind is stubborn about other things. We do not want to take care of ourselves physically. We do not want to take care of ourselves mentally and spiritually. Even when we know that doing certain things will positively affect us, we still have a hard time doing them. That stubbornness can spiral into something worse. We spend our time chasing things that will not make us feel better, we steep ourselves in attachment and consumption, we deceive people, we see the world negatively, and we cheat the world to satiate our own hunger. We do this in our lives when we are too “busy” with something that keeps us from dedicating time to what is important. We see politicians do this in their lives when they take money from corporations and private lobbying groups to push for policies that hurt people and the planet but make the rich richer. We see spiritual leaders do this in their lives when they take advantage of their followings. No one is immune to this tendency of the mind. The Guru says it is like the tail of a dog. It cannot be straightened out. Even a mind that is not intoxicated is always in this struggle. And this intoxication branches out into so many manifestations of different symptoms that we do not know how to even begin addressing them. Greed, attachment, addiction, anger, fear, othering — these are all symptoms of an intoxicated mind. 

So what can we do? Guru Teghbahadar says that we ought to live every day in the Remembrance of the Charming Beautiful One, to Identify with the Charming Beautiful One constantly. This praise and Identification is our work. We can Identify with the One in so many different ways — we can Identify through service, through reflection, through meaningful relationships, through singing. This Identification happens in the world; it is not relegated only to particular spaces or particular times. Identification with the One, in whatever way, is the thing that allows us to focus on freeing our minds from their tendencies. This is how the mind is able to listen to what it is being told. This is how we can address the root cause of our various symptoms in behavior and thinking. This is how we address the gravity of the issue of the human condition, of our primordially stubborn minds, and tune them as instruments so that they are not so dissonant. Can we begin to focus on and address our human conditions? Can we learn to listen to that teaching which falls upon our ears? Can we Identify with the Beautiful One who can make our thinking beautiful? Can we let that beautiful thinking make our behavior beautiful? This is the single most important task!

The creative and all-pervasive Force (IkOankar) is One, that is, unparalleled. IkOankar can only be realized through the grace of Wisdom (Guru).
In Rag Devgandhari, Sabad revealed by Guru Teghbahadar Sahib.

This mind does not do even a bit of what I say.
I have become tired of repeatedly advising it, and still, it does not give up its flawed understanding.1. Pause.

This mind has gone mad in the intoxication of material attachment; it does not sing the praises of IkOankar.
It deceives the world through trickery and feeds its hunger for material things with wealth accumulated through deception.1.

Just as a dog’s tail does not straighten, the flawed understanding of the mind does not go away; it does not heed any instruction.
Guru Teghbahadar states: O mind! Always reflect on the virtues of the all-pervading IkOankar, through which your task of making this human life fruitful may be accomplished.2.1.

1 creative and all-pervasive Supreme Being; through the grace of the true Guru.
Rag Devgandhari, Ninth Embodiment.

This mind does not do even a bit of (what is) said.
(I) have grown weary, having imparted teaching from my side, (it) does not move away from false thinking.1. rahau.

(It) has become mad in the intoxication of Maya; does not utter the praise(s) of Hari.
Having practiced deception, (it) cheats the world, (and) fills its belly.1.

As the tail of a dog does not become straight, (it) does not place in the ear (what is) said.
Nanak’s statement: Sing praises of the Nam of Ram everyday, through which (your) affair(s) may be set right.2.1.

This stanza employs natural linguistic expression. Through an accessible language it has been stated: This mind does not do even a bit of what is said. I have grown weary having imparted teaching from my side, but it does not refrain from false thinking (durmati). Having become mad (bāvaro) in the intoxication (madi) of material allurement, it does not utter the praises of IkOankar. It deceives the world and fills its own stomach (udaru) with such deception.

This stanza is revealed by Guru Teghbahadar Sahib while addressing his own mind in a first-person style. Usually, this is the method used in the Guru Granth Sahib to instruct the human mind.

In this stanza, commonly used Braj language and its popular proverbial phrases have been used beautifully, such as: ‘naik na kahio karai’ (does not do even a bit of what is said), ‘sīkh sikhāi rahio’ (I have grown weary, having imparted teaching), ‘na ṭarai’ (does not move away), ‘bhaïo bāvaro’ (has become mad), ‘apno udaru bharai’ (fills its own belly), ‘suān pūch jiu hoi na sūdho’ (just like the tail of a dog, it does not become straight), ‘kahio na kān dharai’ (does not place in the ear what is said), and ‘kāju sarai’ (affairs may be set right).

A simile has appeared in ‘suān pūch jiu hoi na sūdho’ (just like the tail of a dog, it does not become straight). Here, the baseness of the mind (the subject of comparison) is compared with the bend of a dog’s tail (the object of comparison).

This stanza contains six lines. The meter of these lines is as follows: first (14), second (16+10), third (16+10), fourth (16+10), fifth (16+10), and sixth (16+10). This meter is similar to the verse form known as ‘pad’ in Indic poetics.