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saloku m: 1.
nānak phikai boliai tanu manu phikā hoi.
phiko phikā sadīai phike phikī soi.
phikā dargah saṭīai muhi thukā phike pāi.
phikā mūrakhu ākhīai pāṇā lahai sajāi.1.

saloku m: 1.

nānak phikai boliai tanu manu phikā hoi.

phiko phikā sadīai phike phikī soi.

phikā dargah saṭīai muhi thukā phike pāi.

phikā mūrakhu ākhīai pāṇā lahai sajāi.1.

Guru Nanak focuses this verse on how we speak, but the verse does not start with a statement on what people are doing. Instead, Guru Nanak says, if we speak tastelessly or without flavor, then our bodies and minds will become tasteless — those of us who are empty talkers and hypocrites will feel the effects of this on our own selves. Those empty idle discussions, where there is no beauty or inspiration or love will result in us feeling that there is no love or inspiration in our bodies, and we will become exhausted. And if we are exhausted, we have already driven ourselves out of the realm of the Divine Court because we don’t feel the presence of IkOankar (1Force, the One Universal Integrative Force, also referred to as 1-Ness), or the inspiration. The Court of IkOankar is the dwelling place of IkOankar, where IkOankar operates and has authority. Wherever and whenever we feel the presence of IkOankar, that is the court of IkOankar. This is unlike the classically religious idea of an otherworldly place where judgment will be done later — instead, the decision-making is here and now, and the court is eternal. Driving ourselves out of the realm of the Divine Court ultimately results in disgrace, shame, and lots of pain. This is not just about people who speak about empty things — it is also about those who say all the right words but who speak with a hollowness, who speak without inspiration or genuine feeling. There are plenty of people who speak and display one set of values and, through their own behavior, act in a way that shows the opposite set of values.

Nanak! By speaking unpleasantly a person’s body and mind become unpleasant. The person who speaks unpleasantly is considered ill-mannered and has a reputation of being disrespectful.
A person who speaks unpleasantly is not accepted at the Court and is thrown out; such a person is damned (spit upon).
A person who speaks unpleasantly is called ignorant, and suffers pain (receives punishment of shoe-beating).

Nanak! By speaking unpleasantly, the body and mind become unpleasant.
The unpleasant (speaker) is considered rude (and) unpleasant is the reputation of the unpleasant.
The unpleasant (speaker) is thrown (out) of the Court (and) spits are thrown on the face of the unpleasant.
The unpleasant (speaker) is considered ignorant, (and) receives punishment of shoe-beating.

This salok of four lines uses word ‘phikā’ (rude/unpleasant) nine times in different grammatical forms in order to refer to a person who speaks unpleasantly or rudely. This poetic scheme, known as lexical parallelism, falls under the category of alliteration, and helps enhance the poetic aesthetics of the lines. The salok starts with an action (that is speaking unpleasantly) and then lists the effects of such an action (on the mind and body becoming unpleasant as well. Such a person is considered as unpleasant who gains a disrespectful reputation) and the consequence of this (is being thrown out of court of IkOankar, receiving damnation, being called ignorant, and finally, receiving a punishment). Thus, flowing linearity, the salok lends weight and intensity to the effects of the aforesaid attitude and message contained in the salok. In addition to the known features of language, the salok also employs colloquial expressions like ‘spit on the face’ (signifying damnation) and ‘shoe beating’ (as punishment) to enhance its poetic beauty.

The metric convention of all four lines of this salok is 13+11. This can be categorized under a two line verse/couplet with 13+11 characters each (doharā chand), which has been formed by combining two doharās.